Cap and bells yeats

I think I chose this poem to look into because I am not very good at understanding poetry but I like the fact that I can understand what the poem is based off of and in return get more out of the poem and that William Yeats connects on a personal level with a piece of history.

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It seems odd for the cap and bells to succeed where heart and soul, the usual tools of romantic prostration, fail, until they are understood as symbols of his complete and utter submission to her. She as depicted as being stubborn and uninterested by proclaiming she refused to listen. Furthermore, In contrast with the soul, the heart sings to the queen through the door. A main reason they do this is due to the fact that they either have a strong belief in that very idea or it somehow correlates to an important piece of their life overall. Yeats got deep into his nation 's mythological past for insight Yeats 1 His early poetry and drama acquired ideas from Irish fable and arcane study. The reason behind my choosing of this poem is due to my deep love of history. He begins by offering the queen his soul, then his heart, but it is only when he gives her his cap and bells, though he knows that in giving them he will die, that she accepts him. The cap and bells are inescapably phallic—as is the way in which they are received by the queen, particularly considering the symbolism of the motif of drowning or being covered in hair in the larger context of the Wind Among the Reeds. This stanza was entirely focusing on the rejection of the jester by the young queen, telling the readers that simple attentions from the jester is not going to help him win her favours. When he bids his heart go to her, he tries a new entry point: the door, which is closed, but which his heart still attempts to violate by singing through it. Since presenting his soul, his identity to the young queen did not get her attention, the jester sends up his heart to her. She recognizes the significance of the gift immediately, receiving it in kind: she absorbs the cap and bells into herself by covering them with her hair and sings to them, greeting art with art. He bade his heart go to her, When the owls called out no more; In a red and quivering garment It sang to her through the door. But then again we all work so hard to help create the future for one another.

She laid them upon her bosom, Under a cloud of her hair, And her red lips sang them a love-song Till stars grew out of the air. They set up a noise like crickets, A chattering wise and sweet, And her hair was a folded flower And the quiet of love in her feet. We do not see him, but fragments of him; he does not woo the queen, fragments of him do.

What is your reaction to this poem.

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Yeats was also involved in fighting for an Irish free-state, which is where he really got to show his Irish nationalism. Therefore, despite the fact that the heart had grown passionate by dreaming of the possible blossoming love, the queen still drove away the heart from her.

She recognizes the significance of the gift immediately, receiving it in kind: she absorbs the cap and bells into herself by covering them with her hair and sings to them, greeting art with art.

He bade his heart go to her, When the owls called out no more; In a red and quivering garment It sang to her through the door. The queen does not accept the jester until he has given her his self, his manhood, and everything he has, and indeed until he has proven himself willing to sacrifice himself for and to her.

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Furthermore, "Cap and Bells came to Yeats in a dream most likely steaming from his obsessive infatuation he had for Maud Gonne. The poem topics range from love to mythology and folklore. Since presenting his soul, his identity to the young queen did not get her attention, the jester sends up his heart to her.

It rose in a straight blue garment, When owls began to call: It had grown wise-tongued by thinking Of a quiet and light footfall; But the young queen would not listen; She rose in her pale night-gown; She drew in the heavy casement And pushed the latches down.

She opened her door and her window, And the heart and the soul came through, To her right hand came the red one, To her left hand came the blue.

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The Cap and Bells by William Butler Yeats