An essay on criticism paraphrase

But let a Lord once own the happy lines, How the wit brightens!

an essay on criticism part 1

In wit, as nature, what affects our hearts Is not th' exactness of peculiar parts; 'Tis not a lip, or eye, we beauty call, But the joint force and full result of all. Syllable - --Any of the units into which a word may be divided, usual consisting of a vowel- sound with a consonant.

An essay on criticism quotes

But most by numbers judge a poet's song; And smooth or rough, with them is right or wrong: In the bright Muse though thousand charms conspire, Her voice is all these tuneful fools admire, Who haunt Parnassus but to please their ear, Not mend their minds; as some to church repair, Not for the doctrine, but the music there. He contracted tuberculosis of the bone when he was young, which disfigured his spine and purportedly only allowed him to grow to 4 feet, 6 inches. Some valuing those of their own side or mind, Still make themselves the measure of mankind; Fondly we think we honour merit then, When we but praise ourselves in other men. The following licence of a foreign reign Did all the dregs of bold Socinus drain; Then unbelieving priests reform'd the nation, And taught more pleasant methods of salvation; Where Heav'n's free subjects might their rights dispute, Lest God himself should seem too absolute: Pulpits their sacred satire learned to spare, And Vice admired to find a flatt'rer there! This poem was completed in when Pope was 21 and published two years later. In search of wit these lose their common sense, And then turn critics in their own defence: Each burns alike, who can, or cannot write, Or with a rival's, or an eunuch's spite. Consequently, Dennis also appears in Pope's later satire, The Dunciad.

With mean complacence ne'er betray your trust, Nor be so civil as to prove unjust. Part 2 Of all the causes which conspire to blind Man's erring judgment, and misguide the mind, What the weak head with strongest bias rules, Is pride, the never-failing vice of fools.

Essay on criticism figures of speech

At length Erasmus, that great, injur'd name, The glory of the priesthood, and the shame! These monsters, critics! Learn hence for ancient rules a just esteem; To copy nature is to copy them. An Essay on Criticism was famously and fiercely attacked by John Dennis , who is mentioned mockingly in the work. This is a testament to his belief that the "Imitation of the ancients" is the ultimate standard for taste. Through the speaker, Alexander Pope, in this poem, we think his character and personality as the following. But you who seek to give and merit fame, And justly bear a critic's noble name, Be sure your self and your own reach to know, How far your genius, taste, and learning go; Launch not beyond your depth, but be discreet, And mark that point where sense and dulness meet. He contracted tuberculosis of the bone when he was young, which disfigured his spine and purportedly only allowed him to grow to 4 feet, 6 inches. Such shameless bards we have; and yet 'tis true, There are as mad, abandon'd critics too. Once on a time, La Mancha's knight, they say, A certain bard encount'ring on the way, Discours'd in terms as just, with looks as sage, As e'er could Dennis of the Grecian stage; Concluding all were desp'rate sots and fools, Who durst depart from Aristotle's rules. Surge E.

Be Homer's works your study and delight, Read them by day, and meditate by night; Thence form your judgment, thence your maxims bring, And trace the Muses upward to their spring; Still with itself compar'd, his text peruse; And let your comment be the Mantuan Muse.

Yet let not each gay turn thy rapture move, For fools admire, but men of sense approve; As things seem large which we through mists descry, Dulness is ever apt to magnify. This is in reference to the spring in the Pierian Mountains in Macedonia, sacred to the Muses.

True wit is nature to advantage dress'd, What oft was thought, but ne'er so well express'd, Something, whose truth convinc'd at sight we find, That gives us back the image of our mind.

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Most critics, fond of some subservient art, Still make the whole depend upon a part: They talk of principles, but notions prize, And all to one lov'd folly sacrifice. Therefore, he says ironically that other poets think of their unmeaning couplet as a thought.

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An Essay on Criticism by Alexander Pope